SixOnSaturday. Running late!

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Rather late to the party this week! It was Thanksgiving day on Thursday. Here’s my Thanksgiving cactus, right on cue!

And here’s part of the squash and dried gourd harvest as table decoration.

Tradition dictates decorating for Christmas the weekend after Thanksgiving. So you don’t freeze your fingers off. Today is warm and sunny so I picked spruce, juniper, holly, and red twigs from my own garden. And some pretty ivy that has started colonizing my fence. Tomorrow I’ll forage white pine boughs and cones to complete the assortment of cut branches for winter window boxes.

The rabbits have once again eaten all my parsley. It was so pretty yesterday. Too bad I didn’t take a photo…..too late!

But here’s a bunch of sage I picked this morning. Drying nicely.

And a wreath I made a few years ago from grape vine. I will add fresh greenery to it for the front door.

Its late in the day for some of you and still early for others. That’s the beauty of SixOnSaturday. Anyone can join, whenever they choose. See more sixes from everywhere at the host’s blog.

http://www.thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com

where the rules may also be found. (Really there are few rules).

SixOnSaturday September 26th Beginning Autumn.

Its time for another SixOnSaturday. From the garden, six things. In the comments section of the host http://www.thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com you will find other Sixes to make you smile. In the featured picture you will see my favourite sign of the changing season. The pre-migratory feeding frenzy begins.

 1. The garden is showing signs of the seasonal change. A couple of chilly nights is all it takes. The Magnolia Stellata (which may be on its final season if we have a tough winter) is turning to gold with bright red berries. Caryopteris Blue Knight, all a-buzz, lights up the understory.

2. The Blueberries are starting to show their colours.

3. Gleaming beads of Callicarpa or Beautyberry. Apparently you can make jelly from them. I never have.

4. The very last squash is hanging on to the Ilex Verticilata, whose red berries will have been eaten by blue jays long before the squash is ripe.

a nice trailing of Virginia creeper and a wild rose are also in residence.

5. Goldenrod is just amazing this year.

6. and it is time to start picking the winter vegetables. Here are some leeks, Bleu Solaise. There’ll be lots of soup on our winter menus.

The tomato plants have been pulled, the compost and ground cover crops have been planned and discussed. All that is needed now is to get on with it! I did break out the chipper today to make material for next year’s paths so that’s a start. These dog days are so beautiful, it is hard not to just stand and watch them go by.

Have a wonderful week in the garden!

SixOnSaturday August 24th. Green and growing.

Summer is at its height. The harvest continues at a ridiculous rate. Some things in the garden are taking advantage of the hot,  sultry days.IMG_20190821_0827071. Pumpkin and squash reaching out across the marsh,  looking for support from the phragmites that my neighbour  so optimistically cut down to the ground in spring!

IMG_20190821_0824432. Wild grape growing at a mile a minute along the tops of a red paper dogwood.

IMG_20190821_1041033. Tall elder branches bend to touch the earth,  under the weight of almost ripe berries.

IMG_20190823_1505584.Nicotiana sylvestris, growing full throttle, loving the late summer heat.

IMG_20190823_1454535. Goldenrod preparing for glory, at 6 feet tall and still growing….

IMG_20190820_145036IMG_20190820_1452106. Praying Mantis, enjoying our tropical climate. A rare and ethereal tourist.

Visit thepropogatorblog.wordpress to see what’s going on with gardens everywhere.

SixOnSaturday – reasons to be cheerful.

Today is my first blogging anniversary. Thank you to The propagator and his Blog-followers for inspiration and guidance. Follow here:  www.thepropagatorblog.com

It is the second night of Passover and Easter Saturday. All reasons to be cheerful.

It is also a full moon. I wish I knew or could retain more of the lore and legend surrounding the Spring holidays. My Six this week just celebrate the magic.

 

IMG_62251. From the Passover Seder.  Parsley, representing springtime and all it promises. It is in the ground this week and in 2 more weeks will be ready to be sampled!

 

IMG_62242. Horseradish, the bitter herb, a reminder of hardship. This one is still very small and might be a dock! I’m not sure, but if it is horseradish it will be harvested for Rosh Hashana in the Autumn.

 

IMG_20190419_1439303. For certain, Easter peas. Sown on St Patrick’s Day (indoors of course) and planted on Good Friday according to (my) tradition. One row each of Lincoln & Topps. To be supplemented by more sowings outdoors. When I get around to it. I love peas.

 

IMG_20190419_1040254. Bloodroot, which has blood red sap. Seems symbolic of all the needless bloodshed and sacrifice that Spring holidays stand for….

 

img_6226.jpg5. Simple Daffodils. For me, the best harbingers of Spring. These are probably Ice Follies, or Mount Hood. They look to be ready for dividing. add that to the endless to-do list!

 

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6. The white birds were one of my reasons for starting this blog. They arrive like tourists from a cruise ship in spring and congregate for their departure at the first threat of frost. They are back for the season. The male on the left has his ‘glad-rags’ on and is all ready for date night. She doesn’t look too sure….

I am catching up to the rest of you. I do have tulips already. I wait so long for early spring that I don’t want to move on to the next phase too quickly. Tulips can wait until next time.

Enjoy your week!

SixOnSaturday March 16th. Green

 

I have a bit of a garlic problem. As in there’s always too much. Around spring first it gets too sprouty and strong. In years past I have tossed it in the compost pile, resulting in more garlic in more places than anyone could possibly need.  It’s in the rose border,  among the hellebores… I have a particularly healthy colony among my japanese anemones. By the time I notice it, the seed heads  are merrily popping their little pearls into new and inextricable corners. img_20190313_114348.jpg1. Last year’s garlic. Bear in mind that I only ever plant 24 cloves. From left to right:

– sprouted,  to be pulverized and sprayed as pest control,

– sprouted,  large,  to be potted up as a backup to my autumn planted garlic, in a section of the vegetable garden where it is supposed to be,

– unsprouted, very strong, to be roasted, frozen and used as needed.

 

IMG_20190313_144102.jpg2. Paper pots. An experiment.  Made from cardboard packaging foraged from my place of work . These will be used for peas and sweet peas. I hope they don’t disintegrate before I get them in the ground.

 

IMG_20190315_1123213. Velcro ties from my store bought romaine lettuce. I knew they would be useful for something!

 

img_20190315_112800.jpg4. Snowdrops. Left behind by the melting snow.

 

5. Hints of hellebore.

 

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6. Green. When you’ve spent the winter looking at white on grey and brown there’s nothing more exciting than few blades of green! Time to start raking!

Happy St Pat’s to all!

Six on Saturday. Six things,  random or related,  from your garden. Contributions from gardeners worldwide may be found in the Comments section of the founder’s  twitter post.  thepropogatorblog.wordpress.com.