SixOnSaturday December 7th. All is White

1. First snow.

And so it came, on the first day of the last month of the decade. Not an inch or so as predicted, but 8 inches over 36 hours.

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2. The beagle and I had gathered festive foliage for our winter window boxes. The woods we walked in were carpeted with leaves. Lots of white pine windfall branches to be had. Strangely,  no cones this year.  Plenty of time to find them on another walk,  another day. Or so I thought….IMG_20191201_114141

3. From my garden, we cut red twigs and holly,  cedar,  fir and juniper, seed heads of actea. IMG_20191201_115725

4. Thankfully I had already filled up the bird feeders. The antics of chickadees, titmouse and wren kept us entertained throughout the storm. The heron has left for a warmer climate and the goldfinches are wearing their khaki winter plumage. Dark-eyed Juncos and Buffleheads have arrived, with an occasional merganser or eider duck in the flotilla. Cardinals, Blue Jays and woodpeckers brighten up the scene.

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5. The hawk awaits….IMG_6108

6. All is calm,  all is white!IMG_20190304_080822

Visit http://www.Thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com to see what’s going on in gardens everywhere. I’m sure that somewhere it is warm with flowers!

Six on Saturday, Giving Thanks.

1. As a result of traveling in October we missed Halloween. So did my only pumpkin. I picked it green before we left. It finally turned orange this weekend and was processed just in time for Thanksgiving pies, breads and treats. My aged beagle loves pumpkin mash.

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2. Harvesting the carrots, beets and some of the many leeks took up my time this week. Enough to keep us in my favourite roasted root vegetables  for the next couple of months. IMG_20191110_115435

3. Still in the ground are most of the leeks, parsley, kale and chard. If weather holds on the mild side we can still pick from the greens. The leeks will be fine until spring, even if I have to cut them above the frozen earth. IMG_20191110_115851

4. The compost bins have been ransacked to cover as many empty beds as possible. IMG_20191110_115813

5. Dahlias are safely in storage.IMG_20191110_115502

6. There are still leaves to be raked,  windfall logs to be chopped,  compost piles to be built and spread. But here’s a happy little volunteer mullein,  all ready to shine next Spring! IMG_20191110_132327

There’s no end and no beginning in gardening. One thing always leads to another. Thanksgiving is always appropriate.

On that note, please visit the website of the host:

http://www.Thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com for news from his own garden and many more.

Six on Saturday October 19th. Strange Times.

It’s been a funny old week. I’ve had laryngitis, no voice at all,  much to everyone’s relief. Very frustrating for me. So we went to the local agricultural fair,  by all accounts the oldest of its kind in the US.

1. Behold, the record-breaking giant pumpkin! IMG_20191013_163240Shortly after this picture was taken one of our party was rushed by ambulance to the ER, suffering what was diagnosed to be a panic attack brought on by all the crowding and shoving around the giant!

2. I grew lots of vines this year but only found this one, green pumpkin so far. It’s a nice heavy one, perfectly formed. IMG_20191016_130959

It has been sitting there in the marsh for a while doing nothing. We were expecting a storm so I hauled it back in. It has begun to take on an orange tinge,  so by Halloween it might be ready.

3. The storm (or bomb cyclone as they are known these days in over dramatic weather forecasting circles)  roared through and aside from laying down an old, dead shagbark hickory did no real damage in the garden. IMG_20191018_123334My neighbours were not so lucky,  ending up with giant Norway maples on their roofs, cars and in their pools.

4. The worst casualty here was the flattening of the  giant purple dahlia. It’s a really ugly thing anyway, and won’t be coming in for the winter.  IMG_20191018_123510I’m saying thank you and goodbye to it as soon as I can find time to get the pruners out. It could have taken a first at the local agricultural show, based on the sad prizewinning entries.

6. Finally for this week, something I’ve never seen.  Cercis canadiensis is flowering again. IMG_20191018_123059

I’ve  reminded her that it’s Autumn and time to think about powering down. Strange times….

Anyway, stop by the host’s site http://www.thepropagatorblog.com to visit gardens hither and yon…..and have a good gardening week

SixOnSaturday October 5th. Red.

Baby girl is 2 today and the first frost is on the pumpkin. I still have a lot to do in the vegetable garden but it won’t be happening this weekend. A road trip to Manhattan is planned. My Six this week highlight the colour red.

1. Knockout rose. A grocery store bargain that continues to flower reliably all season long.img_20191004_141655.jpg

2. Zinnia Queen Red Lime is finally starting to bulk up. They are too subtle and wispy for my taste. I’m going back to my old favourite ‘Benary’s Giants’ next year. IMG_20191004_141618

3. Ruby Chard. Pretty as any flower. Intermingled with beets.IMG_20191004_141232

4. Fruit of Cornus Kousa

5. Ilex Verticilata – Winterberry. Deciduous holly loaded with berries this year.IMG_20191004_1411456. Viburnum Trilobum luminous red against a backdrop of still-green maples.

Stop by the host’s site http://www.thepropagatorblog.com to visit gardens hither and yon…..have a good gardening week

 

 

SixonSaturday. September 21st: Golden Days

The September marsh is ablaze with goldenrod and sumac. There’s a golden theme this week.

1. Caryopteris. Abuzz with pollen-packed bees.IMG_20190916_163441

2. Clematis durandii, perfectly blue with sunshine yellow centres. IMG_20190916_163534

3. Jerusalem artichoke or sunchokes; marsh wildings stealing space from Japanese anemones. IMG_20190915_101644

4. Golden Bantam corn. The rabbit missed a few. IMG_20190918_153919

5. Butternut squash. IMG_20190917_104058

6. Golden fleshed first gleaning of Laratte and Desiree potatoes. IMG_20190917_104025

More Six on Saturday garden snapshots can be found in the comments section of the host,  www. Thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com

 

SixOnSaturday on the last day of August. Plenty.

Since I moved to my Massachusetts garden I have lived with 3 seasons. Winter, Summer and my favourite season of all, Plenty. From September until Thanksgiving or sometimes even New Year we enjoy plenty of sunshine, rain, work, harvesting, and celebrations. Plenty has started early this year,  I’m not sure whether that’s a good sign or not. On to the first six of the season.

IMG_20190830_0810551. State Fair apple. My first apple from the latest work in progress at the long neglected back of the property. I’m hoping for a very low maintenance orchard/ food forest. Time will tell…

IMG_20190830_1408542. Cornelian Cherries. Gleaming jewels of the food forest. Mostly  enjoyed by the birds, I should add. It makes the few they overlook seem more precious.

IMG_20190829_1129513. Onion Harvest. Alisa Craig has done me proud this year. I’ll definitely be going the no-dig route again next year. Now comes the challenge of winter storage.

IMG_20190830_1409404. 4. Ramial chips. Free mulch from a heavily pruned recalcitrant crab-apple. Note the abandoned robin’s nest right at the top of what’s left of the tree.

IMG_20190830_1103105. Soft Lighting. I just love the way the sun, lower now on the horizon, peeks through this magnolia, highlights the lime green of new rose growth beyond the shade and scatters tiny sun puddles on the bricks below.

 

IMG_20190829_1106296. ‘Endless Summer’ Hydrangea, aging gracefully.  I’m fond of the mop-heads but have way too many.  I like to use the dried flowers in holiday bouquets and wreaths. My little demi-lune table is also aging, not so gracefully! That’s all for this week. Lots of pruning,  planting and sowing to do before the 4 letter word beginning with S arrives.

Visit the Propagator’s website for all things garden-y going on this week http://www.thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com

SixOnSaturday August 24th. Green and growing.

Summer is at its height. The harvest continues at a ridiculous rate. Some things in the garden are taking advantage of the hot,  sultry days.IMG_20190821_0827071. Pumpkin and squash reaching out across the marsh,  looking for support from the phragmites that my neighbour  so optimistically cut down to the ground in spring!

IMG_20190821_0824432. Wild grape growing at a mile a minute along the tops of a red paper dogwood.

IMG_20190821_1041033. Tall elder branches bend to touch the earth,  under the weight of almost ripe berries.

IMG_20190823_1505584.Nicotiana sylvestris, growing full throttle, loving the late summer heat.

IMG_20190823_1454535. Goldenrod preparing for glory, at 6 feet tall and still growing….

IMG_20190820_145036IMG_20190820_1452106. Praying Mantis, enjoying our tropical climate. A rare and ethereal tourist.

Visit thepropogatorblog.wordpress to see what’s going on with gardens everywhere.